Online Ayurveda School with onsite internship

Narayana Ayurveda and Yoga Academy (N.A.Y.A) is a well respected and premier Ayurveda college in the state of Texas.

Our professional Ayurveda Seminars are approved and regulated by Texas Workforce Commission-Career School and Colleges.

Narayana Ayurveda and Yoga Academy has been reviewed and recognized as providing training at the professional membership level of Ayurvedic Health Counselor by the National Ayurvedic Medical Association.

Graduates in good standing are eligible to sit for the National Ayurvedic Medical Association Certification Board exam at the Ayurvedic Health Counselor level and upon passage may apply for NAMA professional membership*.

Check out our Ayurveda book

IMPORTANT Announcement

Our online classes have NOT been impacted by quarantine. Next Counselor group begins September 2020, and Practitioner begins November 2020.

N.A.Y.A is registered school with Yoga Alliance.

Note: Our Yoga studies are not regulated by the Texas Workforce Commission.

Start Dates

Ayurveda Counselor September 2020(Applications open July 2020)
Ayurveda Practitioner January 2021

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Answering Service: ‪(512) 761-7563‬

*Provided the students pass the NAMA CB exam.

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Cooking as a Meditation

We all complain we don't have time to do a meditation. How about using something as mundane as cooking as a time to meditate mindfully?

We talk about cleansing our minds, using mundane activities to help our mind and meditating while doing chores-how simple is that?

What effect does food have on our minds? What is the role of consciousness in cooking? What is meditative cooking?

In this podcast, Pandit Atul Krishna talks about food and the mind.

Bhagavad Gita and the Current Political Climate.

Podcast

Ayurveda talks about different mind types by mentioning kayas-the qualities of the mind. Bhagavad Gita Chapter 16 also talks about this. A Sattvik minded person may have

Brahma kaya
Rishi Kaya
Indra Kaya
Yama Kaya

A Rajas kaya can be

Asura (demonic)
Paisaca (vampiric)

Imagine if such a person with such a mind type became a leader of the country? What is the karmic result to its citizens.

A conversation with pandit Atul Krishna and Manjulali about chapter 16 of Bhagavad Gita. The different types of kaya

What-is-a-Guru?

What is a Guru? On this occasion of Guru Purnima on July 4th, 2020 Pandit Atul Krishna discusses the need, importance and qualifications of a Guru? How do we seek a spiritual teacher? What mantras should be used?

Ayurveda and martial arts; Kalaripayattu

By Syama Mehta

Ask anyone to name a martial art and almost no one will mention Kalaripayat (or, Kalaripayattu) even though it is one of the oldest martial arts and probably the originator of every other style in the world. Kalripayat was first mentioned in Dhanurveda which is an upaveda of Yajur veda. Kalaripayat developed into it’s present form in the 11th century. In 1804, the British colonial government banned kalaripayat and it’s practice was limited to rural areas in southern India. Around the 1920s, it began to see a resurgence as the people stood up against the British oppression. Traditionally, children, both boys and girls were initiated in the art of kalarippayattu at the age of 7. In modern times, it is practiced mainly in the south Indian state of Kerala though it has been slowly rising in popularity within and outside of India. In Malayalam, the language spoken in Kerala, “kalari” means training ground or battlefield and “payattu” means training in the art of combat.

Kalaripayat is steeped in tradition and rituals. Every practitioner must perform certain rituals to be accepted as a student by the guru. Before each session, practitioners pray to the gods and touch their guru’s feet for blessings. In fact even before they step into the kalari which is the space where they train, they touch the floor with reverence. Kalaripayat is not just a physical and mental discipline but also a spiritual practice. Students are taught to respect others, show compassion and to use their skills only when absolutely necessary.

This is a fighting style that trains the body and mind for agility and precision. While it is a fighting martial art with a focus on learning about the sensitive points on the body to inflict pain, it takes this knowledge of the body and applies it to heal the body too. These areas are called marma points which in Sanskrit means hidden or secret. There are a total of 107 marma points on the human body of which 64 are considered to be deadly points since piercing them can cause severe injury and even death. An expert kalarippayattu practitioner can use these vital points to hurt or to heal. Kalarippayattu teachers also massage their students with hot medicated oils to make their muscles supple. In fact in some schools before they can start their training, every practitioner undergoes 2 to 4 weeks of hot oil massage to prepare their body for the training.

Kalaripayat and Ayurveda are closely related. Both are rooted in the vedas; Kalaripayat comes from Yajur veda and Ayurveda from Atharva veda. Practicing kalarippayattu makes the body healthy, the mind clear and the spirit reverent which is also the aim of Ayurveda.

Kalarippayattu gained the knowledge of marma points from Ayurveda. Kalarippayattu’s hot oil massage is similar to ayurveda’s abhyanga. Many kalaripayattu teachers are also healers in their community.

Ms Mehta is a Taekwondo teacher Brushy Creek, Texas. She is studying to be an Ayurveda Counselor.

Vastu origin story

What is Vastu (indian feng shui)- Part 1

People call Vastu the feng shui of India. However, Vastu is the vedic art of architecture, design and engineering that got condensed into what became Vastu today. I am talking about Vastu, Vastu Purusha- the entity that dwells in our house. His origin story from Siva, and, Vishvakarma-the divine architect and engineer. This podcast is an excerpt from a class at Narayana Ayurveda on Vastu principles. (I even talk about Thor and asgard--did the moviemakers look up Vastu for this city?)

Diet, Rituals and Bhagavad Gita

Bhagavad Gita series Podcast #2

Listen to Pandit Atul and Manjulali discuss Chapter 17 of Bhagavad Gita, the three modes of Nature (Trigunas:Sattva, Tamas and Rajas), and how it relates to Wicca, Magic, Rituals, Goddess worship, Divine worship, and different diets.

We talk about lactovegetarian diet, six tastes, and what is considered fresh food?

Yoga Philosophy in Bhagavat Gita

Conversation with Pandit Atul Krishna about why is Bhagavat Gita a text for yoga?

Who is a yogi and other interesting gems about Yoga philosophy.

Why do we chant invocation mantras(chants)?

In my book, Ayurveda and the Feminine I have devoted an entire chapter to the actual invocation and the invocation mantras. My students and Ayurveda clients ask me all the time, hence it was time to talk about it. So, what are invocation chants? They are called mangalacaranam- literally translated as auspicious step or beginnings. So, I am talking about what are invocation chants, why and how we do it.

And, I demonstrate chanting of three different chants in this short and sweet podcast.

The script of this podcast is at this link.
https://www.ayurveda-wellness-center.com/post/invocation-chants

Episode art by my student Amy Eisenhower-Omholt.

Enjoy.

Monica B Groover

What is Ayurveda and Yoga Connection?

Ayurveda and Yoga

by Anuradha Rao (Counselor student)

Ayurveda and Yoga have been long used as multi-modality spiritual tools in India from ancient times. Though they may appear similar due to their underlying origin in Samkhya philosophy, they have both grown into 2 different philosophies over a period of time, with Yoga being a separate form of philosophy in the Sad darshanas (6 school of philosophies).


Origin

Ayurveda has its roots in Atharva veda, the book of herbs, spells and healing techniques. Whereas Yoga was first mentioned in Rig veda, the book of songs, mantras and rituals. Though they both have been inspired by Samkhya philosophy, Ayurveda applies Samkhya all throughout its teachings and Yoga has slowly evolved into a philosophy of its own with various texts such as Patanjali's Yoga Sutras bringing in the theme of Ashtanga Yoga etc.

Lineage
Legend says that Ayurveda has its mythological roots in Lord Brahma, who is the creator it and spread its teachings to the world as per the request of Lord Vishnu. Yoga is said to have been created and taught by Lord Shiva, who was referred to as Adiyogi - the first ever yogi. Lord Shiva is also known as Dakshineshwar - as he first taught the techniques of yoga to Saptarishis (the seven sages) by facing the South direction (Dakshina) on a Purnima (full moon day) and thus came to be known and worshipped as Adiguru (the first ever Guru) as well. Thus, both Ayurveda and Yoga have their origin in the Holy Trinity (Brahma, Vishnu and Maheshwara/Shiva).

Purpose
Ayurveda's main goals are the Purusharthas, namely, Dharma, Artha, Kama, Moksha. And if we consider Patanjali's yoga sutras, the main goal there is Samadhi, which is the 8th limb of Ashtanga Yoga. But ultimately both of these philosophies aim on attaining Moksha, the liberation from Samsara - the cyclical loop of birth, life, death and rebirth.

Similarities
The philosophies of India are usually divided into 2 types: Tattva chintana (intellectual philosophy) and Tattva darshana (applied philosophy). Both Ayurveda and Yoga can be considered as Tattva darshanas - where more prominence is placed in the application of the principles and techniques of the philosophies than any mind or intellectual thinking upon them.

Both of these ancient philosophies work on inculcating holistic changes in a person and work on removing the root causes of ailments or obstacles (kleshas). They both consider an individual beyond his/her physical body and mind (unlike western medicine which looks at what is immediately apparent - like symptoms appearing from mind or body). They both consider an individual to be a 5-layered Self (Pancha koshas) with an eternal or sanatana atman - which is ever-existing, without birth or death. Both Ayurveda and Yoga place importance to a person's karmashaya, the pool of karmas of current life (prarabhda karma), and karma from previous lives (sanchita karma).

Both Ayurveda and Yoga work on changing a person's lifestyle through techniques such as Yama, Niyama, Pratyahara (in Ashtanga Yoga) and Dinacharya, Ratricharya, Ritucharya (in Ayurveda). All these techniques can even complement each other when used and applied together.
They both place importance on breathing techniques, chanting and meditation as a way of connecting and calming the mind.

Dissimilarities
While looking at an individual's karmashaya, the main goal of Yoga philosophy is to dissolve them and not create any more karma. While doing this, the Yoga guru/teacher or even the individual may not place focus on Samana or pacification of current issues like how exclusively Ayurveda does with the help of herbs, therapies like panchakarma, marma therapy, massage, counselling etc. Without Samana, the individual may not consistently stick to the holistic path of healing which can otherwise be quite challenging.

The sutras of Ayurveda mention extensively on how to diagnose ailments and also has extensive encyclopedic knowledge on the anatomy and physiology of the body. And also places importance on tridoshas of the body - Vata, Pitta and Kapha (along with mind doshas - Rajas, Tamas, Sattva). Whereas sutras of Yoga and related scriptures mention mostly the trigunas of the mind and how to work through them, with little or no knowledge about the physical body.

It is even believed that the path of traditional Yoga speeds up the appearance of karmas, in order to empty the karmashaya quicker. This can sometimes throw imbalance in a person's life due to the faster appearances of Kleshas (Adhyatmika, Adhibhautika and Adhidaivika). It doesn't place significant importance in living in the society, community etc. Whereas Ayurveda takes a slow and steady approach including social aspects of living.

The link between Ayurveda and Yoga
The present Ayurveda and Yoga practices consistently exchange the techniques and tools mentioned in them for their purposes such as herbs and therapies from Ayurveda (incorporated in Yoga) and asana, pranayama and meditation (incorporated into Ayurveda). Yoga blew into being practiced almost throughout the world in the first half of the 20th century, but the main focus was placed on asana, the physical aspect of yoga than all 8 limbs. They are slowly evolving with more and more people working on raising their awareness of incorporating the entire path rather than just a part of it.

In the hundreds or thousands of years in the future, Ayurveda and Yoga may even merge into one whole philosophy with deepest access to the physical self to the deepest access to the spiritual self.

Anuradha is a yoga teacher in Bangalore, India and has a background in Science and Engineering.

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